The Field Guide to Sequence-Based Identification of Biodiversity: An Interview with Simon Creer

In a new Methods in Ecology and Evolution podcast, Georgina Brennan (Bangor University) interviews Simon Creer (Bangor University) about his article ‘The ecologist’s field guide to sequence-based identification of biodiversity‘. They talk about about where the idea for the paper came from, what it’s aim are and who will benefit from it. We hear how new sequences can improve and enhance current biomonitoring programmes (and make them quicker and cheaper).

To find out more about Sequence-based Identification of Biodiversity, read the Open Access Methods in Ecology and Evolution article ‘The ecologist’s field guide to sequence-based identification of biodiversity‘.

 

New podcast and video

In case you haven’t seen them, this month we have published a new podcast and video so far.

In our latest video, David Warton, The University of New South Wales, Australia, presents his ‘mvabund’ package on multivariate analysis. What makes this software different from other ones on multivariate analysis, is that it’s all about models that you can fit to your data. David explains how to look at the properties of your data and the common pitfalls in modelling multivariate data. He also goes through how to fit generalised linear models to your data. Do check David’s dancing!

Mvabund is a free application.

Movement ecology and habitat selection in human resource users

In their podcast with slideshow, Sarah Papworth and Nils Bunnefeld, Imperial College London, applied ecological methods and principles to GPS data on human movement to investigate the differences in movement ecology and habitat selection in human hunters and non hunters who return to a central place. Please note this is an mp4 file, to listen or download the mp3 file of the podcast click here.

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Some things are not the average

Issue 2.3 of Methods in Ecology and Evolution will be officially published online later this week, but in the meantime we’ve got a great new podcast accompanying one of the papers.

Greg McInerny, of Microsoft Research, discusses the content of his recently co-authored paper addressing the issue of adequately accounting for inter-cell environmental variation when constructing species distribution models.

The paper, Fine-scale environmental variation in species distribution modelling: regression dilution, latent variables and neighbourly advice, by Greg McInerny and Drew Purves, is currently available on Early View but will be formally published in issue 2.3 later this week.

Download the podcast

Fine-scale environmental variation in species distribution modelling

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