Uncertainties in Species Occurrence Data: How to deal with False Positives and False Negatives

Post provided by Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita

Species Surveys: New Opportunities and Ongoing Data Challenges

Technologies, such as drones, open new opportunities for wildlife monitoring ©J. Lahoz-Monfort, UMelb.

Technologies, such as drones, open new opportunities for wildlife monitoring ©J. Lahoz-Monfort, UMelb.

Monitoring is a fundamental step in the management of any species. The collection and careful analysis of species data allows us to make informed decisions about management priorities and to critically evaluate our actions. There are many aspects of a natural system that we can measure and, when it comes to monitoring the status of species, occurrence is a commonly used metric.

Ecologists have a long history of collecting species occurrence data from systematic surveys and our ability to gather species data is only going to grow! This is partly enabled by the fact that citizen science programs are starting to gain a prominent role in wildlife monitoring. There’s a growing recognition that well-managed citizen science surveys can produce useful data, while scaling up monitoring effort thanks to the increased human-power from large numbers of committed volunteers. Continue reading

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Being Certain about Uncertainty: Can We Trust Data from Citizen Science Programs?

Post provided by VIVIANA RUIZ GUTIERREZ

Citizen Science: A Growing Field

Thousands of volunteers around the world work on Citizen Science projects. ©GlacierNPS

Thousands of volunteers around the world work on Citizen Science projects. ©GlacierNPS

As you read this, thousands of volunteers of all ages and backgrounds are collecting information for over 1,100 citizen science projects worldwide. These projects cover a broad range of topics: from volunteers collecting samples of the microbes in their digestive tracts, to tourists providing images of endangered species (such as tigers) that are often costly to survey.

The popularity of citizen science initiatives has been increasing exponentially in the past decade, and the wealth of knowledge being contributed is overwhelming. For example, almost 300,000 participants have submitted around 300 million bird observations from 252 countries worldwide to the eBird program since 2002. Amazingly, rates of submissions have exceeded 9.5 million observations in a single month! Continue reading