Latest papers online

In the past week, MEE has been at the ITN Speciation conference in Jyväskylä. As a result, journal updates have been slower than usual. So here is a quick overview of the new papers available online during the past week:

Research papers:
Movement ecology of human resource users: using net squared displacement, biased random bridges and resource utilization functions to quantify hunter and gatherer behaviour
Sarah K. Papworth, Nils Bunnefeld, Katie Slocombe and E. J. Milner-Gulland
This paper is accompanied by a podcast. Follow this link if you use a Mac to access the podcast.

Modelling dispersal: an eco-evolutionary framework incorporating emigration, movement, settlement behaviour and the multiple costs involved
Justin M. J. Travis, Karen Mustin, Kamil A. Bartoń, Tim G. Benton, Jean Clobert, Maria M. Delgado, Calvin Dytham, Thomas Hovestadt, Stephen C. F. Palmer, Hans Van Dyck and Dries Bonte

Designing a benthic monitoring programme with multiple conflicting objectives
Allert I. Bijleveld, Jan A. van Gils, Jaap van der Meer, Anne Dekinga, Casper Kraan, Henk W. van der Veer and Theunis Piersma

Application – as you know, all our applications are free:
mvabund– an R package for model-based analysis of multivariate abundance data
Yi Wang, Ulrike Naumann, Stephen T. Wright and David I. Warton

Volume 3 Issue 1: Now online

It seems that from the number of submissions we receive at the journal, Methods in Ecology and Evolution has filled an important niche. As our editor-in-chief, Rob Freckleton, wrote to introduce our second volume: “those doing science need to be kept up to date on new approaches, and those developing new methods need a place to publish, as well as be supported in getting their methods used”. The journal appears to have done just that: not only have we published some very popular articles (see our recent posts on 2011 top cited papers part 1, part 2 and part 3) but we have also seen a keen interest from our authors in utilising the online extras that we offer to disseminate their work.

As always, in issue 3.1 we cover a very broad range of articles – the scope includes everything from statistics, to ecophysiology and stable isotope methods. The applications of the methods are as varied as reconstructing snow depth surfaces, tracking migratory songbirds, estimating immigration in neutral communities and assessing the effects of watershed and reach characteristics on riverine assemblages. Being the first issue of the year all content is free to access.

One of our big aims is to promote the uptake of methods. On our video and podcast page, we have support for the papers in this issue, including:

Our first Open Access article by Erica Spotswood and colleagues, How safe is mist netting? Evaluating the risk of injury and mortality to birds, attracted a lot media attention. You can read the press coverage for this article on our News and Highlights page.

This issue also contains a free phylogenetic application: MOTMOT, a model of trait macroevolution on trees by Gavin Thomas and Rob Freckleton. Check out our Applications page describing the latest software tools. It’s worth remembering that all Applications are free.

Finally, Mitch Eaton and William Link provided the catchy photograph that make this issue’s front cover. You can read more about the cover on a separate post, available tomorrow!

We hope you enjoy reading this issue!

Recently accepted articles

We have been very busy this week and we have a whole range of recently accepted articles:

  • Bats as bioindicators – The need of a standardized method for acoustic bat activity surveys
    Peter Stahlschmidt and Carsten Brühl
  • Developing a deeper understanding of animal movements and spatial dynamics through novel application of network analyses
    David Jacoby, Edward Brooks, Darren Croft and David Sims
  • BaSTA: an R package for Bayesian estimation of age-specific survival from incomplete mark-recapture/recovery data with covariates
    Fernando Colchero, Owen Jones and Maren Rebke
  • Designing a benthic monitoring programme with multiple conflicting objectives
    Allert Bijleveld, Jan van Gils, Jaap van der Meer, Anne Dekinga, Casper Kraan, Henk van der Veer and Theunis Piersma
  • Category count models for resource management
    Paul Fackler
  • mvabund – an R package for model-based analysis of multivariate abundance data
    David Warton, Yi Wang, Ulrike Naumann, and Stephen Wright
  • Movement ecology of human resource users: using net squared displacement, biased random bridges and resource utilisation functions to quantify hunter and gatherer behaviour
    Sarah Papworth, Nils Bunnefeld, Katie Slocombe and E.J. Milner-Gulland

Issue 2.6

Our last issue for 2011 is out. Issue 2.6 is packed with the latest methodological developments.

We have four new articles on monitoring: from positional accuracy in the field by Mike Dodd to distance sampling butterflies by Nick Isaac and colleagues, to how to account for non-independent detection of individuals by Julien Martin and collaborators and, finally, to a class of spatial capture-recapture models for ‘search-encounter’ data by Andrew Royle, Marc Kéry and Jérôme Guélat.

Two articles focus on modelling distributions. Darryl MacKenzie and colleagues present their work on modelling habitat and species distribution dynamics and Peter Wilson introduces an analytical framework applying a distance-based approach to the ordination and analysis of maps produced by species distribution modelling tools.

Kristen L. Granger and collaborators explain their extraction and assay methods on seed chemistry while Adam Davis et al look at seed predation rates.

Also, Joseph Chipperfield et al model dispersal kernels, Alexandre Bec and co-authors assess the reliability of fatty acid–specific stable isotope analysis for trophic studies. Jeroen Groot and Walter Rossing review recent developments in systems modelling which support learning by creating a salient diversity of management alternatives and by translating science-based results into stakeholder perspectives.

Nicholas J. Gotelli, Werner Ulrich and Fernando T. Maestre explore randomization tests for quantifying species importance to ecosystem function and their article takes the front cover.

Finally, the issue contains two free Application articles. In the first Conrad Stack, Luke Harmon and Brian O’Meara detail RBrownie, an R package for testing hypotheses about rates of evolutionary change. In the second, Stefan Prost and Christian Anderson present TempNet, a method to display statistical parsimony networks for heterochronous DNA sequence data.

Ask your librarian to get free access in perpetuity to the first two years of Methods in Ecology and Evolution by completing this request form or learn about how to access the journal in 2012.

Our twelfth application!

The publication of smatr 3 – an R package for estimation and inference about allometric lines, by David Warton, Remko Duursma, Daniel Falster and Sara Taskinen, marks our twelfth published application paper – and, like the first eleven, it’s available for free.

Methods in Ecology and Evolution’s applications are intended to provide a citable description of new methods and techniques in ecology and evolution, with the intention of promoting and maximising the uptake of these new approaches. The papers we’ve already published span a huge range of methodologies, providing new tools for testing the tempo of evolution in phylogenetic trees, assessing the effectiveness of forest carbon conservation, and performing a broad array of spatial statistical analyses – to name but a few.

You can view the full range of applications on the MEE website.

Methods blogging

Here’s a nice piece by Karthik Ram, of Inundata, about RNCEP, an application whose introduction we recently published on Early View.

RNCEP is a package of open-source R functions that make it easy to access and use two free, long-term, high-quality atmospheric data sets with global coverage, and comes highly recommended for anyone interested in climate data and questions related to global change!

Related

Top papers for June

Open access research papers, freely available applications, and papers supported by podcasts continued to be our most popular publications for June.

Open papers How safe is mist netting? Evaluating the risk of injury and mortality to birds, by Spotswood et al., and A simple method for in situ-labelling with 15N and 13C of grassland plant species by foliar brushing, by Putz et al., both received a lot of downloads, with How safe is mist netting? – the first large-scale analysis of the risks involved in mist netting – being featured on the Guardian science blogs, and in Conservation and Birdwatch magazines.

Applications – all freely available – likewise continue to be highly downloaded, with several new arrivals just falling short of being among our most popular papers for this month.

Finally, as ever, papers accompanied by podcasts have continued to be popular, with Getting started with meta-analysis, The art of modelling range-shifting species, and Fine-scale environmental variation in species distribution modelling all featuring among the month’s top ten most downloaded.

Related

 

Accessing Methods in Ecology and Evolution

Methods in Ecology and Evolution stopped being available to everyone at the start of this year, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still access it for free!

For starters, you can encourage your institutional librarian to sign up for free access to volumes 1 and 2, in perpetuity, by directing them to this opt-in form.  You can also get free access to Methods as a member of the British Ecological Society – please contact the journal coordinator for further details, or check earlier issues of the Bulletin.

In the meantime, our application papers remain free to access, and much of the software they describe is also free to download.  Methods should also be available via the GORA, OARE and INASP philanthropic initiatives.

Finally, if you’re keen to ensure that your work is openly available to all, please remember that Methods is a part of the Wiley Online Open programme.

Volume 2 Issue 1: Now online

We launched Methods in Ecology in Evolution because we thought that there was a huge demand for methods papers: those doing science need to be kept up to date on new approaches, and those developing new methods need a place to publish, as well as be supported in getting their methods used. Our first volume has exceeded all expectations and we are really pleased to announce that the first issue of volume 2 is online on time and is full of a diverse range top quality papers.

The range of papers in this new issue is extra-ordinary – the scope includes everything from statistics, to energetic modelling and stable isotope methods. The applications of the methods are as varied as measuring food web dynamics, uncovering the drivers of farmland bird declines and the use of phylogenetic methods for reconstructing the history of the molluscs.

One of our big aims is to promote the uptake of methods. On our video and podcast page, we have support for the papers in this issue, including :

In fact almost all of the papers in this issue are supported by either a podcast, a videocast or online supplements. These latter include the user manual explaining how to used the WaderMorph modelling software, amongst others.

This issue contains an important “application” paper: Thomas Etherington gives an outline of the tools he has developed for visualising genetic relatedness in landscape genetics. Look out for more of these, describing the latest software tools, on our Early View page.

We are pleased to see that our papers are beginning to be used: the 10 papers published just a year ago in issue 1 have been cited (according to Google Scholar) a total of 34 times in the first twelve months since publication, i.e. an average of 3.4 times per paper. This is fantastic – for comparison, a journal wilth a Thomson ISI© Impact Factor of 3.4 receives an average of 3.4 citations per paper in the two years following the year of publication.  This is hopefully an indication of good things to come!

Welcome to methods.blog & see you at INTECOL

This is the new blog for the new Methods in Ecology and Evolution journal from the British Ecological Society and published by Wiley-Blackwell. This blog will highlight content in the journal, new research in ecological and evolutionary methods, as well as provide a sounding board for developments in the journal and publishing. Updates will be provided by members of the editorial team.

One of the first places we will be promoting the new journal is at the INTECOL meeting in Brisbane. Look out for us on the Wiley-Blackwell stand, we will be running updates from the meeting including summaries of sessions at which the journal editor is participating and highlights of talks with interesting methodological content.

Rob Freckleton