What are the newest methods being used?

At INTECOL 2013, Methods’ Associate Editor, Barb Anderson, interviewed a number of delegates and asked them: What is the newest method that you currently use?

The answers in this podcast are given by the following people:

  1. Bill Sutherland, University of Cambridge, UK (00.18)
  2. Georgina Mace, University College London, UK (01.04)
  3. Simon Leather, Harper Adams University, UK (01.12)
  4. John Norden, Retired, UK (01.16)
  5. Julia Jones, Bangor University, UK (01.35)
  6. Ken Wilson, Lancaster University, UK (01.57)
  7. Andy Sheppard, CSIRO, Australia (01.59)
  8. Tiago Silva, Cefas, UK (02.02)
  9. Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, UK (02.24)
  10. Alastair Fritter, University of York, UK (02.37)
  11. Hugh Possingham, University of Queensland, Australia (02.39)
  12. Jane Hill, University of York, UK(02.45)
  13. John Whittaker, Lancaster University, UK (02.59)
  14. Mike Dodd, Open University, UK (03.09)
  15. Dan Faith, Australian Museum, Australia (03.24)
  16. Han Olff, University of Groningen, Netherlands (04.04)
  17. Dave Raffaelli, University of York, UK (04.14)
  18. David Tillman, University of Minnesota, USA (04.26)
  19. Sandra Diaz, Córdoba National University, Argentina (04.33)
  20. Humphrey Crick, Natural England, UK (04.42)
  21. Helen Roy, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK (04.47)
  22. Carsten Dormann, University of Freiburg, Germany (05.13)
  23. Steve Hubbell, University of California, Los Angeles, USA (05.25)
  24. Justin Travis, University of Aberdeen, UK (05.36)
  25. Sue Hartley, University of York, UK (05.38)
  26. Gavin Thomas, University of Sheffield, UK (05.49)
  27. Corey Bradshaw, University of Adelaide, Australia (05.54)
  28. Tom Webb, University of Sheffield, UK (06.12)
  29. Emma Sayer, Open University, UK (06.20)
  30. Phil Hulme, Lincoln University, New Zealand (06.24)
  31. Hamish McCallum, Griffith University, Australia (06.29)
  32. Matthew Davey, University of Cambridge, UK (06.39)
  33. David Orme, Imperial College London, UK (06.42)
  34. Sarah Papworth, National University of Singapore (06.47)
  35. Satu Ramula, Åbo Akademi University, Finland (06.58)
  36. Dave Hodgson, University of Exeter, UK (07.16)
  37. Jarrod Hadfield, University of Oxford, UK (07.31)
  38. Aldina Franco, University of East Anglia, UK (07.40)
  39. Tom Oliver, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK (07.45)
  40. Sean Connolly, James Cook University, Australia (08.04)
  41. Adriano Paglia, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil (08.17)
  42. Johan Oldekop, University of Sheffield, UK (08.19)
  43. Felix Eigenbrod, University of Southampton, UK (08.24)
  44. Steven Sait, University of Leeds, UK (08.27)
  45. Barry Brook, University Adelaide, Australia (08.36)
  46. Illia McClain, University of Exeter, UK (08.39)
  47. Zuzana Münzbergová, Institute of Botany, Czech Republic (08.48)
  48. Christophe Sausse, CETIOM, France (08.50)
  49. Dai Koide, Yokohama National University, Japan (09.09)
  50. Anne Cotton, University of Essex, UK (09.14)
  51. Ilkka Hanski, University of Helsinki, Finland (09.26)
  52. Hilary Ford, Bangor University, UK (09.38)
  53. Richard Pearson, University College London, UK (09.46)
  54. Jonathan Silvertown, Open University, UK (09.59)
  55. Takashi Koyama, Hokkaido University, Japan (10.02)
  56. Owen Petchey, University of Zurich, Switzerland (10.11)
  57. Claire Kremen, University of California, Berkeley, USA (10.16)
  58. David Klein, Wageningen University, Netherlands (10.24)
  59. Adam Vanbergen, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, UK (10.33)
  60. Melanie Hatcher, University of Leeds, UK (10.39)
  61. Mike Hassell, Imperial College London, UK (10.45)
  62. Colin Beale, University of York, UK (11.01)
  63. Hannah Griffiths, Lancaster University, UK (11.16)
  64. Matthias Boer, University of Western Sydney, Australia (11.23)
  65. Rob Brooker, James Hutton Institute, UK (11.26)
  66. Tom Ezard, University of Southampton, UK (11.33)
  67. Ian Newton, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UK (11.43)
  68. Robert Poulin, University of Otago, New Zealand (11.50)
  69. Andrew Beckerman, University of Sheffield, UK (12.01)
  70. Markus Eichhorn, University of Nottingham, UK (12.04)
  71. Luca Börger, Swansea University, UK (12.07)
  72. Ingolf Kühn, UFZ, Germany (12.12)
  73. Leonie Valentine, University of Western Australia (12.15)
  74. Charles Godfray, University of Oxford, UK (12.26)
  75. Regan Early, University of Évora, Portugal (12.44)
  76. Gavin Thomas, University of Sheffield, UK (12.47)
  77. Honor Prentice, Lund University, Sweden (12.54)
  78. Richard Gill, Imperial College London, UK (13.01)

Look out for more podcasts from Barb, about the oldest methods currently being used, potentially useful methods that have not yet been invented, and the most transformational methods in various fields of research.

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3 thoughts on “What are the newest methods being used?

  1. Pingback: What are the oldest methods still being used? | methods.blog

  2. Pingback: If you could invent a method, what would it be? | methods.blog

  3. Pingback: What method has transformed your field the most, during your career? | methods.blog

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